How to stand out in Facebook groups (in a good way)

You’ve seen them. The people in some Facebook groups whothe negative nelly’s, the ones “asking for feedback” and linking to their offers, the complainers, the whiners, the vague-bookers, posting vague questions. Rolling your eyes you know they’re just trying to sell their shit.

These peeps all stand out in Facebook groups. But do you want to work with them?

No way.

And the dreaded, “Admin, delete if not allowed.” C’mon guys.

If you’re not sure if something you’re posting is okay to post, then don’t. Or, you can also just get in touch with an admin for permission before posting.

You want to stand out in Facebook groups because you know your potential clients are all hanging out in there.

How do you get their attention without getting drunk and stripping in their living room?

Serve.

Focus on being useful on Facebook and people will notice you.

Being visible in facebook groups early on when I first left my corporate job landed me some fabulous clients. And I’m still working with some of these rad clients a few years later.
 

Here’s how to be awesome in Facebook groups:

1. Keep it positive
We want to be around people who make us feel good. Surrounding yourself with positive people can help you be happier too. Be one of those positive and encouraging forces who’s there to cheer people on, and offer smart advice. Do you want to be known as someone who whines and complains all the time? In a way, though, I’m grateful to these people because I know who I won’t hire or refer my clients to.

2. No pity parties
Sure we’re all handed a shit sandwich from time to time. Tell your story then ask for advice, ideas, or inspiration. Ask for what you want—support, a funny GIF, knowing you’re not alone.

3. Show up and serve
This article is all about service. If you chime in on posts only when peeps are looking to hire someone with your expertise that becomes quickly obvious. Look at Facebook as an opportunity to connect.

You don't have to stress about replying to every person’s post with hearts, thanks, and likes. You can get in and get out in 15 minutes a day and be supportive wherever you can. Imagine being that friendly face standing next to the chips and guac at a party. You don’t have to talk to everyone, simply pipe up when you can share some words of encouragement and help someone on their journey.

4. Follow the rules
Breaking the rules in a Facebook group is like coming into my house puking on my bed and then treading your dirty shoes across my couch. You’ll make more friends if you read and follow the rules—they’re there for a reason.

5. It’s not the airport
You don't have to announce your departure. If a group isn't for you just leave quietly. How to know if a group isn't for you? It feels slimy, you feel icky, and roll your eyes a lot.

6. Remember, humans are there
There are real humans just like you with eyeballs and fingernails behind every post and question. Before you start responding, pause and make sure you’d say what you’re about to say to a friend.

7. Ask questions
Facebook is a great big conversation happening 24-hours a day. When you slow your scroll to comment on a post, consider if they’re looking for advice or not. Maybe they need help understanding a problem. If you pop in and ask smart questions, you’ll start a conversation. People don’t remember what you say, they remember how you made them feel, and asking great questions is an excellent way to do that.

8. It’s not all business all the time
You are more than your work. If you see a topic you know a thing or thirty about, hop in and offer your experience. I’ll jump into posts all the time on things I have experience in—food, wine, immigration, bulletproof coffee. It doesn't need to be business-related for you to engage in a conversation. That’s what LinkedIn is for.

 

Facebook is one of my favorite places to hang out with like-minded business owners and freelancers. When you work alone, it can feel a little isolating at times, so it’s a wonderful place for connection and conversation. And, it can also be a great tool to help you stand out as you continue to position yourself as an authority in your industry. Just do it with class.

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